FIRST YEAR ANNUAL

A collection of the best features and essays from our first year. A perfect sampler for newcomers and a warm look back for those who joined us early. 


THE MOST EXPENSIVE THING YOU OWN IS TIME

RYAN SPARKS

A message from Southern Glossary's editor, one year in to a "grand but vague" venture

SOUTHERN IDENTITY CRISIS

BRAD RHINES

A personal essay about the volatility of Southern signifiers and why we embrace some and hide others, both in art and the real world


WORKING IN BLACK & WHITE

RYAN SPARKS

Artist Nate Powell talks about bringing history to life in March: Book One and examines how growing up in the South in the post-civil rights era prepared him to do it.  

In film, directors and actors are a few steps removed from the images they will ultimately convey through the production process. For a visual artist, the gap is nonexistent when you are bringing something like the waterlogged and beaten corpse of Emmett Till to the surface of the paper line by line.


THE WHOLE GRITTY CITY

BRAD RHINES

A documentary follows members of school marching bands in and out of uniform on the streets of New Orleans

After watching hours of footage about Dinerral Shavers, snare drummer for the Hot 8 Brass Band and band director at L. E. Rabouin High School, after hearing about how Shavers was shot in the back of the head, taking a bullet meant for his 15 year-old stepson, after hearing the kids in the neighborhood talk about Shavers as a mentor and positive influence, Barber decided to make his first film.


THE SCARS OF OUR CONNECTIONS

JILL ENSLEY

A response to the powerful waterscape photos of Edward Burtynsky

Living in Louisiana, on the Gulf Coast, it's hard not to go into Edward Burtynsky's new exhibition of photography, Water, without preconceived notions about oil and water, the result of being surrounded by each one, both threatened and sustained by each.  It's hard not to view such industry with a critical eye when you live so close to the largest man-made environmental disaster the United States has ever seen.  

WATER LIKE STONE

RYAN SPARKS

Two filmmakers document the lives of people on the front lines of coastal land loss in Louisiana

They may live in a situation that is unimaginable to many, but they as much as anyone from an unrecognized community are eager for their story to be told and told accurately.  

“People have conceptions, if not misconceptions, about what life is like down there. It isn’t a Cajun pleasureland of happiness and joy that you see in tourism commercials."


REVOLT AGAINST THE DOUBLE BIND

BRAD RHINES

Painter John Westmark incorporates sewing patterns into narrative work about the metaphorical battle women fight against oppression. 

“All of my work for the last four or five years is really about depicting women in some type of perceived revolt or aggressive stance to an unseen antagonist,” says Westmark. “I don’t want to be this spokesperson for gender equality and the next wave, or whatever the next predominant feminist movement is, but I don’t think things are necessarily fair and equal. What I see is: it’s not a level playing field.”     


COHABITATE WITH ABRAHAM LINCOLN

BRAD RHINES

Skylar Fein creates a historical reconstruction installation where visitors can personally explore one chapter of Lincoln's past.  

“If there was a necessity to these men sharing a bed, it’s not the necessity that historians are referring to. It was some necessity that drove them to share beds, and that drove Lincoln to continue to share beds later. That’s a necessity that almost no one has ever dared to address.”

KATRINA ANDRY

RYAN SPARKS

Katrina Andry's giant prints with woodcut reductions dramatically illustrate the negative stereotypes minorities have been burdened with.

“When you’re walking around, doing anything, taking a shower, however your day plays out, there’s lots of things that you can forget, but you can’t forget that you’re black. It’s impossible. It feels impossible to be an individual because you don’t have the freedom to be an individual when you’re looked at as being the same [as anyone who looks like you] and when ‘the same’ is not good.”


PHOTOGRAPHER & PARTICIPANT

RYAN SPARKS

Paul Kwilecki spent 40 years documenting his hometown of Decatur, GA.

The people he photographed across decades--black Pentecostal preachers, shop-owners, factory workers--aged alongside him, caught up in their daily work just as he was. By tying his work so closely with Decatur and its high schoolers, its lake-sitters, its clerks and its criminals, he possibly hoped to elevate them all beyond familiarity.


NEW METHODS MINE DEEP RICHES IN HOLLOW

RYAN SPARKS

A ground-breaking web-based documentary exploring the future of rural America through the eyes of the Appalachians is grabbing eyeballs from around the world.

McDowell County lies in the southeast corner of West Virginia, draped across some of the richest deposits of coal in the Appalachians. The town once boomed, and in order to meet the demand for labor, coal companies recruited men from as far away as eastern Europe. Then, inevitably, technology advancements and increasing competition brought a bust to the area. Drug use skyrocketed, particularly prescription painkiller abuse, as did the amount of people reliant on some form of governmental assistance.


To explore more, check out our collection of Back Issues.